Sunday, October 14, 2012

Verse/78

When earthen vessels tumble they keep it in order
When bronze vessels tumble they tend with care.
When our vessel sinks they forsake it because it stinks.
What an inexplicable one is your trick of mingling with the numbers? Oh Lord!

Verse/83

Where are the temples? Where are the holy ponds?
You loathsome people who worship the temples and ponds! Temples and ponds are in one’s mind.
There is neither creation nor destrution.
Never, never, never.

Verse/23

When the boat exists one can run and ride for recreation.
While the boat exists one can determine.
When the boat is smashed, In the incomparbale space
There is no goat, no stick, and there exists none.

Verse/15

There is no sampradhaya sans the seed, either above or below.
In what way can the palace sans the architect take shape?
You ignorant! You sell your mother and turn her a slave!
When there is no emancipation there is no life.
Never, never, never.

Verse/51

As one traps the tiger with a goat Is it fair for you to delude me showing a cow?
Oh! King who killed and skinned the elephant with a stick:
You should reveal me showing the way of emancipation.


source: http://forum.santabanta.com/showthread.htm?223792-Sivavakkiyar-Poems/page3&s=0a07a57c83b2dbec1c779a496ab1bb3c

நீளவீடு கட்டுறீர் நெடுங்கதவு சாத்துறீர்,
வாழவேணும் என்றலோ மகிழ்ந்திருந்த மாந்தரே?
காலன்ஓசை வந்தபோது கைகலந்து நின்றிடும்
ஆலம்உண்ட கண்டர்பாதம் அம்மைபாதம் உண்மையே!


[Worldly Meaning]

Building big house and putting big door
You desire to live happily ever after
Nothing can save you when Yama (Lord of Death) comes
Only the Visakanda (Supreme) who had Halahala (poison) can save you

source: http://forum.santabanta.com/showthread.htm?223792-Sivavakkiyar-Poems/page2

The 'unknowing' ones say:

"Far away, far away far away is 'God'

"The Supreme-Being is spread everywhere"

 "On the earth and in the skies."


O you poor unknowing ones running through towns

And country, and jungles suffering in search ..

 Know well that 'God' is right there within You ..

So stand still !

Sivavakkiyar

 source:http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Mystic_Spirit/message/1277

Monday, September 3, 2012

Sivavakkiyar poet

Sri Sivavakkiyar (sometimes Civavakkiyar) was a great Tamil Poet who lived in the period preceding the 10th Century A.D.

Sivavakkiyar was an early rebel against the Brahmanic order, he was resolutely opposed to the Caste system and was opposed to idol worship and temple ceremonies. His rebellion against any kind of orthodoxy meant his work was left out of the Saiva canonical literature however some of his poetry is well read in Tamil literary compendiums.

Sri Sivavakiyar, was born with Lord Shiva's name on his lips. He said that the constant repetition of the Lords name would even turn ones body into gold. A great rennuciate he is said to have lived for over 4,000 years. His works include Naadi Parikshai and Sivavakiyar 1000.

He came to Kasi after learning vedas. There he met a Siddhar/Seer/Saint, who was also a cobbler. Though the Saint/Siddhar could sense the power of Sivavakiyar, he wanted to test him. So he gave Sivavakiyar some money and asked him to give it to his sister, 'River' Ganga. He also gave him a bitter Bottle Gourd and asked him to remove the bitterness from the Bottle Gourd. Sivavakiyar immeditely left for the river bank without any second thoughts on whether the tasks can be completed or not. After he reached the banks, a beautiful hand raised above the water and Sivavakiyar without any second thoughts placed the money on the hand. The hand returned back into the water. He also washed away the bitterness from the bottle gourd and took it back to the Siddhar. The Siddhar was happy to see that Sivavakiyar had passed the test. He wanted to test him once more. So he gave Sivavakiyar a waterbag and instructed Sivavakiyar to call out for Ganga and ask for the money that he had given her earlier. Sivavakiyar at once called out to Ganga asking for the money. Immediately a beautiful hand appeared from the waterbag and gave him back the money. Sivavakiyar, without being perturbed even for a single moment, took the money and gave it to the Siddhar. The Siddhar was realy impressed on Sivavakiyar's ability to focus without being bothered by doubts or anxiety. Then he asks Sivavakiyar to lead a family life till he attains samadhi. He also gives him some sand and a bottle gourd and says that the lady who cooks both the sand and the bottle gourd would be his wife.

After taking leave from the Siddhar, Sivavakiyar continues his pilgrimage. In the midst of his travel, he meets a Nari Kurava (Gypsy) group and they welcome him wholeheartedly. After talking to them for some time, a lady from Nari Kurava gang rushes upto him and says that she will be happy to serve him and that he should not hesitate to ask for her help. Sivavakiyar immediately gives her both the sand and bottle gourd and asks if she could cook both sand and bottle gourd together. The lady without hesitating a moment, takes both and rushes to the kitchen. After some time she comes back with cooked rice (the sand has turned into rice) and bottle gourd curry. Sivavakiyar immeditely realizes that he has met his wife and asks the group if he could marry her. They also agree to the proposal on the condition that he also stays and travels with them. He also agrees and marries his lady. But he also makes sure that he does continues with his spiritual practises.

Siddhar Sivavakiyar continued to stay with the Gypsy group and also diligently learnt their work. Once he went to the forest to get firewood. He chose a tree and started to cut. Suddenly Gold Dust started sprinkling from the tree. After seeing this he started to run shouting that "Lord Yama" (Angel of Death) has arrived. His group asked him what happened and he told them what he saw. Hearing this some 4 people left for the forest with gunny bags to collect Gold Dust. By the time they had filled their bags it started to darken. Since they were hungry, it was decided that two of them would go to the nearest village to get food. Those who went to the village planned to kill their partners who had stayed behind, so they added poison to the food. And the two persons who had stayed behind also plotted against the other two partners who had gone to get food. On their way back to the forest, the two persons who had gone to collect the food were done to death by the other two persons. After killing their partners, they sat down to have their food and in no time they also passed away. Next day Sivavakiyar saw the four bodies and felt sorry that these four people had lost their lives to "Lord Yama" (i.e. the Tree).

Sivavakiyar had a friend with the name Konganar, who was also a great Siddha. Konganar felt very bad that his friend, who is a Master Siddha, was living a life of poverty. So one day, he went Sivavakiyar's home, knowing that Sivavakiyar would not be available. He asked Sivavakiyar's wife to get some Iron and turned the same to Gold and left after handing over the Gold to her. Sivavakiyar's wife narrates the incident to him after his return. Sivavakiyar asks his wife on whether she wants the Gold. His wife replies that his love is all that she wants and not the gold. Then he asks his wife to drop the gold in the well and his wife also obliged wholeheartedly.

One day few devotees of Siva came to Sivavakiyar and asked whether he would teach them to make Gold, so that they could eradicate poverty and this also will help in removing negative Karma. Hearing this Sivavakiyar laughed and asked why Gold is required for removing negative Karma. He also advised them to leave behind all materialistic desires and merge their consciouness with Lord Siva. And added that this is the only way to attain Nirvana.

It is believed that he was an Atheist who later converted to Saivism and then to Veera Vaishnavaism. He attained Siddhi at kumbakonam. Even now pujas are regularly conducted escpecially on Full Moon Day. Those who pray to him are blessed with clear mind without any anxieties or worries about the past or future. One can pray to Sivavakiyar on Mondays, wearing white clothes and with white flowers. This is told as a remedy for those people with Chandra Dhosham.

He was generally considered to be an iconoclast because he vehemently decried temple worship. He did so no doubt, but he said still more vehemently that man should make his heart the temple of God. He had scant respect for rituals which in popular belief had become a substitute for love and service to God and to fellow beings. He was a vehement opponent of caste. Almost all the siddhas believed in the oneness of all creation and they preached a philosophy of love and service and of an inward contemplation. Sivavakkiyar is a shining example of this faith. Some of his verses have the force of a sabre thrust.

Sivavakkiyar explains the transformation of the physical body into a divine body on the analogy of a worm turning itself into a butterfly. Let us state briefly the various stages involved in kaya sadhana. Sthula sarira is the unripe, ordinary, physical body not disciplined by yoga. It is a "deceptive threshold", and one has to "open" it , i.e., go beyond it to achieve kaya siddhi. Sivavakkiyar says that people should protect, immortalize, and preserve the body through the method of yoga just as they would protect a beautiful lady of the house73. When the sthula sarira is disciplined by yoga it becomes ripe or pakva.

Sivavakkiyar is fond of using the expression threshold, i.e., " vasal " in Tamil and he calls the human body as a threshold where God resides. The concept " threshold " is a mystical one and the body is one such mystical threshold, the other threshold being the guru.

In Siddha literature the threshold is a mystical thing. It is a boundary between two worlds, the ordinary, profane world and the sacred world beyond. It is a point where we pass from one mode of being to another, from one level of consciousness to another. The term " vasal " used by the Tamil Siddhas stand for the moment when we ourselves open up to new depths of our being. They say that one need not go to
places of pilgrimage or study sastras when the threshold is in oneself. The idea of the body as a microcosm of Reality received a spiritual, mystical denotation in the Tamil Siddhas as against the purely physical denotation of it in the other traditions. The inter- relations of man's body and the universe (that is Reality) have to be realized by spiritual endeavour. Kaya sadhana is such an endeavour.

Another important aspect of the Siddha view of the human body is nyasa, which consists of feeling the God or powers representing the Gods in different parts of the body.

source:http://www.poemhunter.com/sivavakkiyar/biography/

Sunday, April 29, 2012

Aathiyaanathu onrume anekaneka roopamaai
saathi bethamaai ezhunthu sarva jeevan aanathu
aathiyodu irunthu meendu ezhunthu jenmam aanapin
sothiyaana gnaaniyaagi suthamaai iruppane

The above verse is from siddha Siva Vakkiyar. The explanation of who is god is very simple. The supreme being is one and it is responsible for all forms of life. That supreme being is in the form of light and if living beings understand and mingle then they shall have wisdom.


Siddhas in this sense mentioned about the supreme power as light in the inner self.


Saying that God in the form of light is inside one’s self itself and he has to recognize it. All scholars from the major religions talk about god as the form of light which is present inside one’s self.
Here once again comes siva vaakkiyar

Odi Odi Odi Odi Utkalandha Sothiyai
Naadi Naadi Naadi Naadi Naatkalum Kazhinthu Poga
Vaadi Vaadi Vaadi Vaadi Maandu Pona Maanthargal
Kodi Kodi Kodi Kodi Ennirantha Kodiye

And tells who is search of God can search for God as light in one’s innerself and they won’t fail in finding the supreme power

source: http://www.aekam-theone.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=70:god-is-light-comparative-religion-study&catid=41:comparative-religion&Itemid=34

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

He was generally considered to be an iconoclast because he vehemently decried temple worship. He did so no doubt, but he said still more vehemently that man should make his heart the temple of God. He had scant respect for rituals which in popular belief had become a substitute for love and service to God and to fellow beings. He was a vehement opponent of caste. Almost all the siddhas believed in the oneness of all creation and they preached a philosophy of love and service and of an inward contemplation. Sivavakkiyar is a shining example of this faith. Some of his verses have the force of a sabre thrust.

Sivavakkiyar explains the transformation of the physical body into a divine body on the analogy of a worm turning itself into a butterfly. Let us state briefly the various stages involved in kaya sadhana. Sthula sarira is the unripe, ordinary, physical body not disciplined by yoga. It is a "deceptive threshold", and one has to "open" it , i.e., go beyond it to achieve kaya siddhi. Sivavakkiyar says that people should protect, immortalize, and preserve the body through the method of yoga just as they would protect a beautiful lady of the house73. When the sthula sarira is disciplined by yoga it becomes ripe or pakva.

Sivavakkiyar is fond of using the expression threshold, i.e., " vasal " in Tamil and he calls the human body as a threshold where God resides. The concept " threshold " is a mystical one and the body is one such mystical threshold, the other threshold being the guru.

In Siddha literature the threshold is a mystical thing. It is a boundary between two worlds, the ordinary, profane world and the sacred world beyond. It is a point where we pass from one mode of being to another, from one level of consciousness to another. The term " vasal " used by the Tamil Siddhas stand for the moment when we ourselves open up to new depths of our being. They say that one need not go to
places of pilgrimage or study sastras when the threshold is in oneself. The idea of the body as a microcosm of Reality received a spiritual, mystical denotation in the Tamil Siddhas as against the purely physical denotation of it in the other traditions. The inter- relations of man's body and the universe (that is Reality) have to be realized by spiritual endeavour. Kaya sadhana is such an endeavour.

Another important aspect of the Siddha view of the human body is nyasa, which consists of feeling the God or powers representing the Gods in different parts of the body.

soruces:
http://www.indiadivine.org/audarya/shakti-sadhana/466353-kaya-siddhi.html
http://www.lisindia.net/Tamil/Tamil_lite.html

Saturday, March 17, 2012

Civavakiyar poems are very forceful , revolutionary and was sort of rebel against the Hindu and Brahminic establishment and most of his poems opposes the caste system and Brahminic rituals.

His work is called Civavakiyam. I have quoted some poems and its translation to give idea about his rebel attitude.

30.

Listen

you who take always sacred baths

you who kindle sacrifical fires

you who pour in tons of ghee

hear words of wisdom

hear

The Fires and holy waters

are within

Behold

remember and attest

An endless undiminished light

will appear and union in oneness

be

41.

The veda you recite is spit. The mantras in it are – spit.

All pleasures are but spit. All seven worlds are – spit.

Honeyed sperm is spit.Intellect is spit.Enlightment is – spit

There is nothing, indeed, nothing that is not spit!

Both poems are translated by Kamil Zvelebil

Note: The poem numbers are according to Civavakkiyam version available in Project Madurai.

source:http://karkanirka.org/2008/04/10/cittar-poems-civavakkiyar/

Sexual, alchemical and medical secrets of the Tamil Siddhas, the poets of the powers

By Professor Kamil V Zvelebil.


Foreword

The Tamil Siddhas cannot be regarded as one homogenous 'movement' or 'school of thought' manifesting a unified, well-defined, uniform ideology. A great number of elements have entered into their thinking, some of them pan-Indian, some of them apparently specifically South Indian or Tamil. On the other hand, their overall ideology has, of course, several basic doctrinal tenets in common. As we shall see, some of these tenets are in amazing correspondence with the most recent developments in modern physics of post-relativity and quantum theory era. The schema of dense and subtle matter is one of those tenets: according to ultimate Siddha thought, subtle matter constitutes the inner body of man; matter is nothing but crystallized energy, and a manifestation of infinite and universal mind ('subtle matter' reappears in the theories of physicists of our day). An accomplished Siddha is someone who has learned to harmonize his awareness with this subtle (sub-atomic?) matter of which he is composed. The Siddha alchemist can live in the mode of constant appearance and disappearance, manifestation and dissolution, of subtle matter and energy; and all matter forms a continuum. Neither matter nor consciousness are ultimate, for both have their source in something still 'beyond', in Civam which can not really become object of knowledge. Hence the Siddha poet speaks often of 'silence' :

Silence, unmoved and rising,
Silence, unmoved and sheltering,
Silence, unmoved and permanent,
Silence, unmoved and brilliant,
Silence, broad and immense like the Ganga,
Silence, unmoved and increasing,
Silence, white and shining like the Moon,
Silence, the Essence of Siva.

The only possible predication of the 'something' in which both matter and consciousness have their source is Void, Emptiness. Hence, again, one of the key-terms appearing in Siddha poetry: vettaveli, cuniyam 'utter emptiness, void', veliyirveli (liter.) 'void in emptiness' i.e. supreme, absolute Emptiness; or, simply, veli (liter 'open space; space; openness') 'emptiness':

Gods made out of wood
Gods made out of stone
Gods made out of palmyra fronds
Gods made out of bone
Gods made out of rags
Gods made out of dung
Gods made out of saffron bags
There are no other gods
but
VOID
(Civavakkiyam 503/510)

must be stressed, however, that by this emptiness is not meant a substantive emptiness like 'an empty box'. It is emptiness which is a plenum (more about all this will be said in subsequent chapters). And man can come into contact with this Void. How, that is precisely what the Siddhas tell us.

These, then, are, in very simplified words, some of the ultimate and basic doctrinal points common to all those thinkers, poets, alchemists and physicians designated as cittar (Siddhar, Siddhas) in Tamil India. Now, to speak of less lofty matters, the reader must be made aware that, nowadays, when it comes to Siddha medicine and medical practice, there even exist, in Madras, a government Siddha dispensary, and a government Siddha medical college. Also, let us return to what divides the Siddhas from one another; let us mention at least one of their important 'inhomogeneities' - the Siddha attitude to sex.

The Siddha attitude to sex often manifests features which are in mutual contrast, and thus represents a good illustration of the heterogeneous character of the Siddha 'movement'. On the one hand there are Siddha poets who express utter disgust and revulsion towards women and any sexual activity (e. g. Pattinattar who in Potu 14 speaks of men who 'for the sake of a cunt / perish day and night', and in 31 mentions ' women / who smell of their / sensuality', whose 'limbs stink of their discharge'). Pattinattar is not the only one, although he probably represents the most vigorous manifestation of the ascetic, stern, misogynist trend of Siddha thought. On the other hand, in drastic contrast - so at least it seems - there is an entire group of Siddha alchemist-medicine men who are obviously raised in the Tantrik tradition, and who in fact take part in rituals based on the Tantrik cakrapuja. This stream of Siddha thought and practice will be dealt with in some detail in chapter 12 of this book, but here I wish to indicate very briefly the most salient features of such Tantrik-Siddha ritual.

In the centre of a ritual circle (cakkiram) sits a chosen woman, completely naked, who symbolizes Devi, i. e. Sakti, the Primeval Energy of the Cosmos, the Goddess, and it is characteristic of the Siddha views that caste or community is of absolutely no importance either in the selection of this woman (she can be a virgin as well as a prostitute, a young Brahmin girl as well as a ripe low- caste lady), or in the gathering of the participants. This Sakti, thoroughly washed and perfumed all over her body with various perfumes (according to an exact prescription; for details cf. chapter 12), sits on a sort of pedestal with widely spread legs so that her yoni (vulva) is well visible. The leading Siddha will kiss the yoni, and bless various non-vegetarian foodstuffs through the contact with the yoni by touching and rubbing with them the vulva of the Sakti. Then these offerings are distributed among the participants and consumed. The participating men, who for five days preceding the puja had been eating meat, drinking alcoholic beverages and using aphrodisiacs according to Siddha pharmacopoeia, will naturally be in a state of high sexual arousal which must however be strictly controlled, until ritual cohabitation follows with their chosen female partners which - and this is a basic and most important requirement - must never end in ejaculation of the sperm. The Siddha tenet underlying all this holds that the enormous force which is released by controlled sexual tension must be translated from the gross physical level to the 'subtle' body and ultimately to the psychic level whereby one attains various siddhis or supranormal powers and 'immortality'.

This book consists of some sixteen sections. The introductory chapter describes in broad outlines general features of Siddha medicine (since this is what the book is mostly concerned with), and in the following chapter are spelled out ideological tenets of the specific Siddha quest of immortality. Next chapter deals with basic principles and beliefs of Siddha physicians. The following section gives first a rather detailed account of Siddha materia medica and its use, and moves on to the cure prescribed for a number of various diseases. Three very brief sections follow: on Siddha yoga, daily regime, and alchemy. The following chapter is concerned with the specific Siddha techniques for the attainment of longevity and 'immortality'. Then follows a description of some doctrinal aspects of Siddhism as reflected in contemporary medical practice, and of a visit in a Siddha dispensary in Madras. Tantrik Siddha school and Siddha attitudes to sex are dealt with next. After the conclusions, a short anthology of selected Siddha poetic texts is offered to the reader. Index of terms in precise transliteration and select bibliography close the book.
source:http://www.oralchelation.com/viewpoint/others/article4.htm

Friday, August 19, 2011

From: http://in.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100706024248AAUFwjT
Siva Vaakiyar,one of 18 Sidhars of India, has written poem,which goes like this?

"NATTA KALLAI DEIVAMENDRU, NAALU PUTPAM SAATHIYE;
SUTRI VANDHU MONEMONAVENDRU SOLLUM MANDHIRAM EADHADAA.
NATTA KALLUM PESUMO?NATHAN ULLIRRUKAYIL;
SUTTA SATTI SATTUVAM KARICHUVAYA ARIYUMO?

Means : A planted stones, even you offer flowers to it alongwith Manta utchaadnaas, cannot speak ; but your innerself,where the Almighty resides can speak of Him volumes. The Stone is like a vessel and spoon, which at any time, does not know the taste of food cooked in/with them? But you, yourself with your inner heart know about Him more,which you do not realize.


In the four eternal Vedas,
In the study and reading of scripts,
In sacred ashes and in holy writs
And muttering of prayers
You will not find the Lord!
Melt with the heart inside
And proclaim the Truth.
Then you will join the light
Life without servitude.
He is not Hari, He is not the Lord Siva.
He is the Ultimate Cause,
In the Beyond of Beyond,
Transcending Blackness, Redness, and Whiteness.
Immovable.
Try not to understand:
He is not big, He is not small.
He is Infinite Distance,
Immovable,
Transcending even
Supreme Quiescence.
Sivavakkiyar
http://www.hindu-blog.com/2008/01/sivavakkiyar-poems.html